Dieter Schmid's Fine Tools

VERITAS Small Scraping Plane

VERITAS Small Scraping Plane
VERITAS Small Scraping Plane
VERITAS Small Scraping Plane
VERITAS Small Scraping Plane

The Veritas Small Scraping Plane is used for the final smoothing of small, flat surfaces, even if they are highly figured, or small areas of difficult grain within a larger surface.

Given the fine cutting action of the small scraping plane, it is used after the surface has been prepared as well as possible with a smoothing plane, not in place of the smoothing plane. What the scraping plane does replace, however, is the need for sanding prior to applying a finish. Because the scraping plane cuts the wood fibers rather than tears them, it will further bring out the wood grain, rather than mute it as sandpaper would.

Designed for one-handed use, this small scraping plane has an articulating palm rest for comfortable, controlled grip. This allows it to be positioned to suit your preferred grip in either hand, or for knuckle clearance when working close to an adjacent surface.

The 2 inch (51 mm) wide, 0.040 inch (1 mm) thick, high-carbon-steel blade occupies the full width of the plane body, permitting clean, accurate cuts flush against a perpendicular surface. A set screw lets you bow the blade to make fine depth-of-cut adjustments and to prevent blade corners from leaving ridges in the work. The blade is ground at 45°, allowing you to easily burnish a hook.

A fixed frog sets the blade at 20°, the optimum angle for fine scraping. The edges of all gripping surfaces are chamfered for comfort, as is the leading edge of the lapped sole, preventing it from catching or marring work. The 5-1/4 inch (133 mm) long ductile cast iron body weighs 1-1/2 lb. (680 g)

Caution: Be aware that because the blade is full width, its edges extend beyond the sides of the plane body. If you find these edges uncomfortable as you grip the plane, you may relieve or round over the square edges with a file.
VERITAS Small Scraping Plane

At first glance, the scraping plane, or indeed even scraping itself, can appear odd or mysterious. Why would you scrape wood? Why is the blade angled forward? A closer look at where the actual cutting is taking place reveals the answers. The cutting geometry of the rolled edge on the scraper blade is not that much different from the cutting geometry of a bench plane with a well-set cap iron.

Although the rolled edge on a scraper blade works much like a plane, the cutting action of a scraper is actually more like that of a high-angle smoothing plane (i.e., with a bed angle of 55° or 60° rather than the more common 45°). This means the wood shaving curls abruptly and fails right at the cutting edge, eliminating tear-out and allowing for the working of difficult grain patterns.

The way to sharpen the blade is the same as it appears to scrapers.

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